Lightroom in 60-Seconds: Where The Heck Are My Filters?

I get questions like this all the time — folks who write in or email me telling me their filters have gone missing (they were there before, but now they can’t find them). There are two different types of filters in Lightroom that like to go hiding — here’s a quick video on how to get them back: Hope you found that helpful. Have a great Tuesday everybody! -Scott

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Four Quick Tips for Maximizing Your Lightroom Screen Real Estate

Let’s start this week off with some quick tips for getting more Lightroom on your screen (that’ll make more sense in a moment): Above: here’s our standing view in Lightroom Classic. Now let’s looks at different ways to maximize our working space. Press Shift-F and you’ll notice that Lightroom’s title bar across the top is now hidden, automatically expanding Lightroom’s interface upward to fill in that area. 2. Press Shift-F again, and now Lightroom’s menu bar up top is hidden as well, giving you maximum real estate. Press Shift-F one more time to return to the regular view. You’re toggling through the three different modes with this shortcut. Here’s a couple more…. 3. You can press Shift-Tab to hide all of Lightroom’s panels, so now your distractions are really limited — it’s just your image and the toolbar across the bottom (Bonus tip: if you press the letter “t” even that gray bar across the bottom will tuck itself out-of-site). 4. If you press the letter ‘F,” it hides everything and takes your image full screen (as shown here). That’s it — four quick tips to kick off what could be an incredible week! 🙂 Those are my next stops for my “Ultimate Photography Crash Course” full-day seminar. San Diego on Feb 12, Phoenix the next day on Feb. 13th. Then I’m in Houston on the 23rd and on to LA on the 25th. Come on out and spend the day with me – it’s 100% money-back guaranteed — you’ve got nuthin’ to lose and everything to gain. Here’s the link. See you there! Cheers, -Scott

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Issue 57 of Lightroom Magazine Is Now Available!

Issue 57 of Lightroom Magazine is now available for KelbyOne members on the KelbyOne site and on the KelbyOne Mags app for iOS and Android. In this issue, explore the process of idea-to-image photography projects, plus editing film in Lightroom, migrating images from cloud-based Lightroom to Lightroom Classic, alternative ways to import images into Lightroom, and so much more! Cover image by Rick Sammon KelbyOne Pro & Plus members have access to more than 75 back issues of Photoshop User magazine all the way back to January 2012, plus all 57 issues of Lightroom Magazine. Not a Pro member yet? Click here for more information.

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Platypod: Knocking it Out of the Park with Platyball

Just recently, I had the opportunity to test drive a new ball head, the Platyball. Not available for direct sale until later in the year, it was a preproduction version designed and manufactured by the makers of the popular Platypod Max and Ultra.

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Importing Presets into Lightroom Mobile Directly

We’ve covered how you can import your Lightroom Classic presets into the cloud based Lightroom for desktop app, which then sync across all of the Lightroom cloud apps, and even how to create custom presets within Lightroom mobile directly, but what if you don’t have the cloud based Lightroom desktop app? Many people first get acquainted with the cloud based Lightroom app on their mobile device (Android or iOS phone or tablet) using the free Lightroom mobile app. You don’t need a subscription to use the free mobile app, which is great. However, without a subscription you don’t get the desktop version the Lightroom app or the ability to sync photos and presets across devices. So, how can you import develop presets into the Lightroom mobile app itself? Well, you can’t, exactly. At least you can’t import the preset files specifically. You have to use a bit of a workaround by importing a photo that has Lightroom (or Adobe Camera Raw) settings applied to the photo, then manually make your own preset from those settings, which you can then apply to your other photos when needed. Let’s walk through the steps. Importing a DNG with Settings To begin, you’ll need a photo with settings applied to it that you want to save as a preset. Here’s a DNG file with some settings applied that you can download (and unzip after downloading) and use to follow along. Before preset: After preset: The first trick is to get the DNG file to your mobile device. I used AirDrop to transfer it from my Mac to my iPhone, but you could use Dropbox, OneDrive, or some other service to transfer the DNG file. Note, many times the DNG files provided for creating presets will be compressed in a Zip file (such as the one I provided), as this makes it easier for downloading. It is easier to unzip a file on your computer than your mobile device, but there are apps for both iOS and Android that allow file unzipping on their respective platforms (search for them in the respective app stores). With the DNG file transferred to your mobile device, here are the steps to creating a preset from the settings stored in the DNG file’s metadata: Step One: Import the DNG file into Lightroom mobile app. You import this photo just like you would import any other photo from your camera roll or files location on your device. Step Two: Once the photo is imported into Lightroom mobile you should see the settings that have been applied to it (as the original DNG may not show it when viewing it on your device’s Camera Roll). That means the settings are waiting for you to transform them into a preset. Switch to the Edit view. Step Three: Tap the three-dot menu at the top of the screen and choose Create Preset from the menu that appears. Step Four: This opens the New Preset dialog. You’ll need to make a few decisions here. The first decision is to give the preset a name. Depending on where you got the original DNG file from, it may have been named based on the preset/settings applied, but you can call the preset anything you want (its all yours now!). In this case, I named it “Warm Contrast White Border” because the settings warm up the photo using Split Tone, add contrast with a Tone Curve, and add a white border using the Vignette. The second decision is how to organize your presets. By default, it will be placed in the User Preset group. Nothing wrong with that, but as you add more you may want to group them in a way that makes sense to you. I’ll leave it in the default for now. The third, and most important decision is what boxes to check for deciding what settings to include. The simplest choice is to just check all the boxes. This way you ensure you are including the important settings (the ones that provide the “look” the preset is trying to achieve). The more daring choice is to only check boxes that have settings applied to them, but how do you know what settings to include? Lightroom tries to help you via the Select drop-down menu under the Preset Group choice you made earlier. Tap Select to see its options, which are All, Modified, Default, and None. So you can choose All and just get on with your life, or you can choose Modified and have it only check the settings that shifted from their default settings. In my case, I chose Modified and see that it only checked boxes in the Light (for the Tone Curve), Effects (for the Vignette and Split Tone), and Optics (because I have my preferences set to include lens profile correction by default, which is not relevant to this preset, but it is a setting that was applied). The benefit of only including settings in the preset is that it allows you to apply other settings to the photo first, and then apply the preset without necessarily changing the settings you previously applied (assuming you didn’t change any of the settings included in the preset). Once you’ve made all of those decisions, tap the checkmark in the upper-right corner to complete the preset creation process. The preset has now been added to the preset group you chose and you can apply it to any other photo in your library as you wish. While it may seem like there is a lot involved in this process, once you go through it the first time you’ll see it is not a big deal. That said, I’d love for Adobe to find a way to make it easier to just import the presets directly. However, if you find using Lightroom mobile useful, go ahead and and try the subscription so that you can sync across all of your devices and see how that works for your lifestyle.

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Lightroom in 60-Seconds: Three Ways To Trim Your Panos

This one is a lot better than it sounds. OK, it’s at least somewhat better than it sounds. LOL!! Give it a quick look – you might dig it. 🙂 Hope you dug it. 🙂 Heads up San Diego, LA, Houston, and Phoenix — I’m Coming there very soon I’ll be there with my “Ultimate Photography Crash Course” full-day seminar. Dates and more info right here. Get your tickets now — we had some cities sell out last year and some folks who really wanted to come couldn’t. Don’t miss out. Have a great Tuesday, everybody! -Scott

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How to Use a Gray Card With Lightroom To Nail Your White Balance Every Time

How to set your white balance right on the money by using a gray card and sync, and AutoSync.

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Adding A Background Light Behind Your Subject, All in Lightroom

This one works in either Lightroom Classic or Cloud, and it’s quick, easy, and really effective. Here goes: STEP ONE: Well, this isn’t a step, but here’s our starting image with our subject photographed on a gray background (I shot it on gray seamless paper — I think it was Savage Gray seamless I got from B&H). STEP TWO: Get the Radial Filter tool; Increase the Exposure amount by at least 2-stops (here I went to +2.15, but you can always change the brightness amount later, making it brighter or more subtle). Drag an oval out over your subject (as shown above) making sure it extends out to the background behind your subject. Of course, this oval doesn’t just light the background, it lights your subject as well, but that’s what we’ll fix in the next couple of steps. STEP THREE: Scroll to the bottom of the Radial Filter panel, and from the Range Mask pop-up menu, choose ‘Color.’ Now get the Range Mask eyedropper tool and click it on the background color behind your subject (as shown here), and that will mostly mask away the bright are of the oval from your subject (as seen above). Depending on the image, this will either work amazingly well or just pretty decent with a little tweaking need. If yours falls in the “tweaking needed’ genre, read on to the next step. STEP FOUR: At the top of the Radial Filter panel; click on the Brush tab, then hold the Option key on Mac (Alt-key on Windows), which changes the brush into an “erase” button. Now paint over any areas on your subject that look light they have a little of that spotlight left over them (like I did here painting away any leftovers on her cheek). That’s it! Hope you all have an awesome weekend. Hope to catch ya back here on Monday. 🙂 -Scott

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How to be more creative in 2020

That was our topic yesterday on our podcast ‘The Grid” and our guest was photographer and author Marc Silber. Lots of really great info (sadly, I didn’t bring much to the table on this one, but Marc, Erik and our viewers added a lot and make it a great, really helpful episode. I embedded it below in case you’re looking for something to listen to tonight that will help move you forward photographically this coming year. Hope, you can give it a look (a listen)? 🙂 Stop by back tomorrow for your regularly scheduled Lightroom tips. 🙂 -Scott

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The January 2020 Issue of Photoshop User Magazine Is Now Available!

The January 2020 issue of Photoshop User is now live on the KelbyOne site and KelbyOne Mags for iOS and Android. In this issue, join Terry White as he takes us on an in-depth tour of Photoshop on the iPad, plus using Adobe Fresco, a simple way to create a pencil sketch effect, the new game-changing Object Selection tool, adding a mountainous reflection to ski goggles, and so much more. Check out all the latest magazine articles with our Search Articles feature on the website. We hope you enjoy this issue! This issue’s cover is by the very talented Kirk Marsh! KelbyOne Pro & Plus members have access to more than 75 back issues of Photoshop User magazine all the way back to January 2012, plus all 56 issues of Lightroom Magazine. Not a Pro or Plus member yet? Click here for more information.

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Three Tips to Blur Water

Here Jason shares three tips to blur water in your composition

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The Exposure Triangle – A Primer

When we look at the elements of composition, the three that everyone constantly considers are shutter speed, aperture settings and ISO (or ASA in the old days of film). These three factors make up something called the Exposure Triangle. Readers of…

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The Smart Phone Versus the SLR?

Lately the internet has been teeming with people fixating on the latest iPhone release, and questions are coming through the woodwork asking the same question over and over. Everyone thinks they are coming up with an original question, just because…

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Pano Testing

A while back I was doing some testing of new software for displaying larger panoramas on the blog here and came across a site called Momento360. Has anyone heard of this company before? I bet there are some truly spectacular…

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Finding Clients…

I don’t often use the blog as a venue for talking about photography business, but recently many colleagues have asked me about how I approach things here, in terms of finding sponsors for contests, giveaways, workshops, and all the content…

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5 Tips for Better Pano Photography

With Apple and Android phones, the ability to take panorama photographs has really changed the landscape (if you’ll pardon the pun 🙂 ) for still photography in this genre. You can get some truly stunning results without the need to…

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How to Hold Your Phone Camera

How you hold your camera is so important, yet so many of us take our camera grip for granted, assuming that we will naturally hold it in the most stable way available.  For some, it does come naturally, but for…

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How to Hold Your P&S Camera

After last week’s picture presentation of how to hold your SLR camera got such an incredible response, many people chimed in via email, asking if I could do a piece on how to hold your Point-and-Shoot camera.  While it’s not hugely different,…

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How to Hold your Camera – The SLR

A while back I was up at Maroon Bells in Colorado, anticipating the peak of the fall colors.  The lake there at the base of the Maroon Bells has become quite an idyllic scene for photographers of all levels to…

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In Loving Memory

5/4/2013 was a sad day…after 12 years together, our family dog Maggie had reached a point where her body is just not able to sustain her anymore. Over the last 9 months we have seen her deteriorate slowly. Her Lab…

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